Sapphire Sky

September 25, 2016

How Big Do You Think You Are?

Filed under: encouragement, theology — Tags: , — Steve Knaus @ 6:37 pm

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You need to have self-respect.

Take pride in your work.

Don’t have a low self-esteem!

You need to start by loving yourself.

Don’t let anyone make you feel like you are less of a person.

Look out for number one!

These are the positive messages that we hear every day. You need to take care of yourself. Be nice about it, but you need to have pride!

It is socially acceptable to be proud. It is even encouraged – so long as you’re nice about it – to have pride.

These messages are popular and many of them are well meaning. But what does God say?

All through the Holy Scriptures, God has one message about our pride. Our self-esteem. Our love for ourselves.

There is no doubt. God hates our pride.

The very first of the 10 Commandments says, “You shall have no God before me”. God alone needs to be the center of our worship. Our pride pulls God away and puts ourselves in His place.

Proverbs 6 tells of seven things that The Lord hates, with pride being first on the list.

Isaiah 14 and Ezekiel 28 tells about how the most beautiful angel, Lucifer, was lifted up with pride. He thought he was so elevated, yet he was cast down to earth.

In the New Testament, Acts 12 tells about the wicked king Herod being especially judged by God for being proud (he was eaten by worms).

But there may not be a more vivid example of pride than King Nebuchadnezzar.

Nebuchadnezzar had it all! He had conquered all of his enemies. He was king over all of the known world. He personally led the construction of the great city of Babylon, one of the wonders of the ancient world. Now, later in his reign, he could finally rest and enjoy life.

It was at this time that Nebuchadnezzar had a terrifying dream. He saw a great tree which was tall and visible for all too see. The tree provided shelter and food for all living things. But then an angel from heaven came with an announcement. Chop down the tree and cut off its branches, but leave the stump protected. He will lose his sanity and live like an animal for seven years, until he knows that the Most High has all authority over the kingdom of men.

Anxious to know the meaning of this dream, the king called all of his advisors. Only Daniel was able to give an answer. Nebuchadnezzar is the great tree. He will soon lose his sanity, be driven from people, and will live like an animal. He will in that state for seven years until he recognizes the Most High God. Only God rules over the kingdom of men and gives the authority to whomever He wants.

Daniel followed his interpretation with advice to the king. Nebuchadnezzar needed to stop disobeying God and show justice and care for others. He needed to change his attitude and God might delay the impending disaster.

We do not know if Nebuchadnezzar showed any change of heart after this dream. Any remorse or changes in Nebuchadnezzar were only temporary. Exactly one year later, Nebuchadnezzar was on his rooftop looking at the great city of Babylon. Filled with pride over his accomplishments, he said, “Is this not my great Babylon, that I have built for myself and my own greatness?”

No sooner had the king of Babylon finished these words when there was a voice from heaven announcing the judgment from the Most High God. Nebuchadnezzar immediately lost his sanity and he was driven from the palace. The great king was reduced to living in the wild and eating grass for seven years.

Nebuchadnezzar’s sanity returned after seven years. Ha received back his mind, his kingdom, and his glory, but he learned his lesson. It was no longer all about him. From his own words,

I blessed the Most High, and praised and honored him who lives forever,
for his dominion is an everlasting dominion,
and his kingdom endures from generation to generation;
all the inhabitants of the earth are accounted as nothing,
and he does according to his will among the host of heaven
and among the inhabitants of the earth;
and none can stay his hand
or say to him, “What have you done?”

 

Remember!

  • No matter how great we think we are, we are nothing compared to the Most High God!
  • Our pride is an offense to God. When we lift ourselves up, we are not humble before God, nor are we giving Him the proper credit and glory.
  • Every chapter in Daniel reiterates the same theme. God is the greatest. He is greater than any political, intellectual, or military power in this world. God wins!

 

Clothe yourselves, all of you, with humility toward one another, for “God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble.” – 1 Peter 5:5

 

Previous post: Who is the Greatest?


Daniel 4

 King Nebuchadnezzar to all peoples, nations, and languages, that dwell in all the earth: Peace be multiplied to you! It has seemed good to me to show the signs and wonders that the Most High God has done for me.

How great are his signs,
how mighty his wonders!
His kingdom is an everlasting kingdom,
and his dominion endures from generation to generation. 

I, Nebuchadnezzar, was at ease in my house and prospering in my palace. I saw a dream that made me afraid. As I lay in bed the fancies and the visions of my head alarmed me. So I made a decree that all the wise men of Babylon should be brought before me, that they might make known to me the interpretation of the dream. Then the magicians, the enchanters, the Chaldeans, and the astrologers came in, and I told them the dream, but they could not make known to me its interpretation. At last Daniel came in before me—he who was named Belteshazzar after the name of my god, and in whom is the spirit of the holy gods—and I told him the dream, saying, “O Belteshazzar, chief of the magicians, because I know that the spirit of the holy gods is in you and that no mystery is too difficult for you, tell me the visions of my dream that I saw and their interpretation. The visions of my head as I lay in bed were these: I saw, and behold, a tree in the midst of the earth, and its height was great. The tree grew and became strong, and its top reached to heaven, and it was visible to the end of the whole earth. Its leaves were beautiful and its fruit abundant, and in it was food for all. The beasts of the field found shade under it, and the birds of the heavens lived in its branches, and all flesh was fed from it.

“I saw in the visions of my head as I lay in bed, and behold, a watcher, a holy one, came down from heaven. He proclaimed aloud and said thus: Chop down the tree and lop off its branches, strip off its leaves and scatter its fruit. Let the beasts flee from under it and the birds from its branches. But leave the stump of its roots in the earth, bound with a band of iron and bronze, amid the tender grass of the field. Let him be wet with the dew of heaven. Let his portion be with the beasts in the grass of the earth. Let his mind be changed from a man’s, and let a beast’s mind be given to him; and let seven periods of time pass over him. The sentence is by the decree of the watchers, the decision by the word of the holy ones, to the end that the living may know that the Most High rules the kingdom of men and gives it to whom he will and sets over it the lowliest of men.’ This dream I, King Nebuchadnezzar, saw. And you, O Belteshazzar, tell me the interpretation, because all the wise men of my kingdom are not able to make known to me the interpretation, but you are able, for the spirit of the holy gods is in you.”

Then Daniel, whose name was Belteshazzar, was dismayed for a while, and his thoughts alarmed him. The king answered and said, “Belteshazzar, let not the dream or the interpretation alarm you.” Belteshazzar answered and said, “My lord, may the dream be for those who hate you and its interpretation for your enemies! The tree you saw, which grew and became strong, so that its top reached to heaven, and it was visible to the end of the whole earth, whose leaves were beautiful and its fruit abundant, and in which was food for all, under which beasts of the field found shade, and in whose branches the birds of the heavens lived— it is you, O king, who have grown and become strong. Your greatness has grown and reaches to heaven, and your dominion to the ends of the earth. And because the king saw a watcher, a holy one, coming down from heaven and saying, Chop down the tree and destroy it, but leave the stump of its roots in the earth, bound with a band of iron and bronze, in the tender grass of the field, and let him be wet with the dew of heaven, and let his portion be with the beasts of the field, till seven periods of time pass over him,’ this is the interpretation, O king: It is a decree of the Most High, which has come upon my lord the king, that you shall be driven from among men, and your dwelling shall be with the beasts of the field. You shall be made to eat grass like an ox, and you shall be wet with the dew of heaven, and seven periods of time shall pass over you, till you know that the Most High rules the kingdom of men and gives it to whom he will. And as it was commanded to leave the stump of the roots of the tree, your kingdom shall be confirmed for you from the time that you know that Heaven rules. Therefore, O king, let my counsel be acceptable to you: break off your sins by practicing righteousness, and your iniquities by showing mercy to the oppressed, that there may perhaps be a lengthening of your prosperity.”

All this came upon King Nebuchadnezzar. At the end of twelve months he was walking on the roof of the royal palace of Babylon, and the king answered and said, “Is not this great Babylon, which I have built by my mighty power as a royal residence and for the glory of my majesty?” While the words were still in the king’s mouth, there fell a voice from heaven, “O King Nebuchadnezzar, to you it is spoken: The kingdom has departed from you, and you shall be driven from among men, and your dwelling shall be with the beasts of the field. And you shall be made to eat grass like an ox, and seven periods of time shall pass over you, until you know that the Most High rules the kingdom of men and gives it to whom he will.” Immediately the word was fulfilled against Nebuchadnezzar. He was driven from among men and ate grass like an ox, and his body was wet with the dew of heaven till his hair grew as long as eagles’ feathers, and his nails were like birds’ claws.

At the end of the days I, Nebuchadnezzar, lifted my eyes to heaven, and my reason returned to me, and I blessed the Most High, and praised and honored him who lives forever,

for his dominion is an everlasting dominion,
and his kingdom endures from generation to generation;
all the inhabitants of the earth are accounted as nothing,
and he does according to his will among the host of heaven
and among the inhabitants of the earth;
and none can stay his hand
or say to him, “What have you done?” 

At the same time my reason returned to me, and for the glory of my kingdom, my majesty and splendor returned to me. My counselors and my lords sought me, and I was established in my kingdom, and still more greatness was added to me. Now I, Nebuchadnezzar, praise and extol and honor the King of heaven, for all his works are right and his ways are just; and those who walk in pride he is able to humble.


Daniel 4:1-3
King Nebuchadnezzar to all peoples, nations, and languages, that dwell in all the earth: Peace be multiplied to you! It has seemed good to me to show the signs and wonders that the Most High God has done for me.

How great are his signs,
how mighty his wonders!
His kingdom is an everlasting kingdom,
and his dominion endures from generation to generation.

It has been at least 20 years since the fiery furnace in Daniel 3, and almost 35 years since Nebuchadnezzar’s dream in Daniel 2. Nebuchadnezzar has learned a lot about God of the Hebrews, but he has never considered how God might be interested in him personally.

But now, King Nebuchadnezzar, the pagan emperor, sends out a formal edict to his entire empire1 3. This edict will tell all of his subjects about the greatness of the Most High God, and what He has done for their king.

He is a God of signs and wonders. God uses nature to show his greatness (signs), and he can break the laws of nature to show his might (wonders).

He rules a kingdom that will never end and He is above any human powers.

Note that Daniel 4 is the only chapter in Scripture which was written by a pagan emperor2.

 

Daniel 4:4-7
I, Nebuchadnezzar, was at ease in my house and prospering in my palace. I saw a dream that made me afraid. As I lay in bed the fancies and the visions of my head alarmed me. So I made a decree that all the wise men of Babylon should be brought before me, that they might make known to me the interpretation of the dream. Then the magicians, the enchanters, the Chaldeans, and the astrologers came in, and I told them the dream, but they could not make known to me its interpretation.

Nebuchadnezzar was enjoying a time of peace and prosperity in his kingdom6 when he received a very alarming dream! He brought in all of the wise men of Babylon but they could not tell him the meaning of his dream.

See here for a detailed description of the magicians, the enchanters, and the astrologers. The Chaldeans were the king’s elite advisors (see here).

There is a very close parallel with this dream and Nebuchadnezzar’s dream in Daniel 2. However, it is important to also note two differences:

  • In his earlier dream, Nebuchadnezzar demanded both the dream and its interpretation. Here, he is only asking for the interpretation of the dream.
  • It has been almost 35 years since Nebuchadnezzar’s earlier dream.

The king’s wise men may have been unable to understand the dream, but is also very likely that they fully understood the dream but were afraid to tell the king about the coming disaster!

 

Daniel 4:8-9
At last Daniel came in before me—he who was named Belteshazzar after the name of my god, and in whom is the spirit of the holy gods—and I told him the dream, saying, “O Belteshazzar, chief of the magicians, because I know that the spirit of the holy gods is in you and that no mystery is too difficult for you, tell me the visions of my dream that I saw and their interpretation.

Daniel finally entered after the wise men failed to interpret the dream. Nebuchadnezzar called him by both his Hebrew name (Daniel) and his official name (Belteshazzar). The king knew that no mystery was too great for Daniel, so he asked Daniel to tell him the meaning of this dream.

It appears that Nebuchadnezzar was familiar with Daniel by his Hebrew name. However, he would be more widely known in the Babylonian empire as Belteshazzar, hence the king’s reason for using both names, especially in a message that would be read throughout the empire4.

Nebuchadnezzar says that “the spirit of the holy gods is in you”. Literally, this is Elohim, which is also the plural name for God in the Old Testament. In this context, the this could refer to either pagan deities or about God himself. Given that the king had little knowledge about God himself, it is most likely understood that he considered Daniel’s wisdom to be directly from the gods2.

Ezekiel referred to Daniel in his prophecy as the epitome of wisdom (Ezekiel 28:3).

 

Daniel 4:10-12
The visions of my head as I lay in bed were these: I saw, and behold, a tree in the midst of the earth, and its height was great. The tree grew and became strong, and its top reached to heaven, and it was visible to the end of the whole earth. Its leaves were beautiful and its fruit abundant, and in it was food for all. The beasts of the field found shade under it, and the birds of the heavens lived in its branches, and all flesh was fed from it.

Nebuchadnezzar’s dream was of a great tree. It grew tall and was visible from far away. It was beautiful and provided food, shade, and shelter for all.

It was a common term, especially among ancient kings, to refer to a great ruler as a tree. Therefore, this would not be surprising to Nebuchadnezzar4.

 

Daniel 4:13-16
“I saw in the visions of my head as I lay in bed, and behold, a watcher, a holy one, came down from heaven. He proclaimed aloud and said thus: Chop down the tree and lop off its branches, strip off its leaves and scatter its fruit. Let the beasts flee from under it and the birds from its branches. But leave the stump of its roots in the earth, bound with a band of iron and bronze, amid the tender grass of the field. Let him be wet with the dew of heaven. Let his portion be with the beasts in the grass of the earth. Let his mind be changed from a man’s, and let a beast’s mind be given to him; and let seven periods of time pass over him.

Suddenly the vision changed. An angel (“a watcher, a holy one”) came down from heaven with a pronouncement on the tree: the tree was to be chopped down, its branches and leaves removed, and its fruit scattered. But leave the stump and its roots, and guard it with iron and bronze.

Then the subject of the dream becomes personal, changing from “it” to “him”. The tree clearly represented a person. He will be given the mind of an animal and will be forced to live in the fields with the wild animals for seven years7.

The band of iron appears to be an indicator of divine protection for the stump. It could also be interpreted as “put a fence around it”5.

 

Daniel 4:17-18
The sentence is by the decree of the watchers, the decision by the word of the holy ones, to the end that the living may know that the Most High rules the kingdom of men and gives it to whom he will and sets over it the lowliest of men.’ This dream I, King Nebuchadnezzar, saw. And you, O Belteshazzar, tell me the interpretation, because all the wise men of my kingdom are not able to make known to me the interpretation, but you are able, for the spirit of the holy gods is in you.”

The sentence is decreed by the angels (watchers; holy ones), but it is clearly a decree from God himself (Daniel 4:24). But the point of all this is to show that the Most High God is over all the kingdoms of men.

The reason for this decree is so that the entire world may know the total sovereignty of the Most High2.

“The Lord has established his throne in the heavens,
and his kingdom rules over all.”
Psalm 103:19

“God opposes the proud, but gives grace to the humble.”
(James 4:6, 1 Peter 5:5)

 

Daniel 4:19
Then Daniel, whose name was Belteshazzar, was dismayed for a while, and his thoughts alarmed him. The king answered and said, “Belteshazzar, let not the dream or the interpretation alarm you.” Belteshazzar answered and said, “My lord, may the dream be for those who hate you and its interpretation for your enemies!

Daniel was dismayed and alarmed for a while. Afterward, the king urges Daniel to tell what he knew. Daniel’s response was the formal way of saying that this is very bad news for the king.

Daniel appears to have delayed out of sympathy for the king. He was grieved about the terrible things that were to befall Nebuchadnezzar.

Literally, the text says that Daniel was dismayed for “one hour”, but this was an idiom for “a little while”.

The term, “may the dream be for those who hate you” could have two possible understandings. The first is that it was simply a formal way for Daniel to say that this was very bad news. He was saying, “I wish this had happened on your enemies”. The other possibility is that Daniel is saying that this message would surely please the king’s enemies8.

 

Daniel 4:20-22
The tree you saw, which grew and became strong, so that its top reached to heaven, and it was visible to the end of the whole earth, whose leaves were beautiful and its fruit abundant, and in which was food for all, under which beasts of the field found shade, and in whose branches the birds of the heavens lived— it is you, O king, who have grown and become strong. Your greatness has grown and reaches to heaven, and your dominion to the ends of the earth.

Nebuchadnezzar was the great tree that had grown to become strong and to cover the whole earth.  The term “ends of the earth” was the local Babylonian term to indicate all of their known world.

 

Daniel 4:23-26
And because the king saw a watcher, a holy one, coming down from heaven and saying, Chop down the tree and destroy it, but leave the stump of its roots in the earth, bound with a band of iron and bronze, in the tender grass of the field, and let him be wet with the dew of heaven, and let his portion be with the beasts of the field, till seven periods of time pass over him,’ this is the interpretation, O king: It is a decree of the Most High, which has come upon my lord the king, that you shall be driven from among men, and your dwelling shall be with the beasts of the field. You shall be made to eat grass like an ox, and you shall be wet with the dew of heaven, and seven periods of time shall pass over you, till you know that the Most High rules the kingdom of men and gives it to whom he will. And as it was commanded to leave the stump of the roots of the tree, your kingdom shall be confirmed for you from the time that you know that Heaven rules.

This was the essence of the terrible news for Nebuchadnezzar. There is a decree from the Most High God that Nebuchadnezzar will be brought down. He will lose both his kingdom and his sanity. He will live in the field with wild animals and eat grass like an ox for seven years.

Nebuchadnezzar must stay in this humiliated state until he acknowledges that the Most High God rules over him and over any kingdoms of man. God gives the kingdom to whomever He will.

But there is also hope in this message. The surviving stump indicates that Nebuchadnezzar will be restored after the seven years. He will regain both his sanity and his kingdom after the appointed time.

 

Daniel 4:27
Therefore, O king, let my counsel be acceptable to you: break off your sins by practicing righteousness, and your iniquities by showing mercy to the oppressed, that there may perhaps be a lengthening of your prosperity.”

Daniel followed his interpretation with bold advice to the king. The king needed to humble himself before God and perhaps God would delay His judgement.

Daniel told the king to recognize his sin and to repent (Isaiah 55:7). The moral acts would show that his faith was real (James 2:14-26). Specifically, Daniel advised the king to adopt two new policies2:

  • Reexamine his conduct in the light of God’s moral law
  • Protect the poor instead of allowing the rich to exploit them

 

Daniel 4:28-33
All this came upon King Nebuchadnezzar. At the end of twelve months he was walking on the roof of the royal palace of Babylon, and the king answered and said, “Is not this great Babylon, which I have built by my mighty power as a royal residence and for the glory of my majesty?” While the words were still in the king’s mouth, there fell a voice from heaven, “O King Nebuchadnezzar, to you it is spoken: The kingdom has departed from you, and you shall be driven from among men, and your dwelling shall be with the beasts of the field. And you shall be made to eat grass like an ox, and seven periods of time shall pass over you, until you know that the Most High rules the kingdom of men and gives it to whom he will.” Immediately the word was fulfilled against Nebuchadnezzar. He was driven from among men and ate grass like an ox, and his body was wet with the dew of heaven till his hair grew as long as eagles’ feathers, and his nails were like birds’ claws.

God delayed His judgement for one year. It appears that Nebuchadnezzar may have reformed somewhat after Daniel’s warning but he never truly repented.

After a year, Nebuchadnezzar was walking on the roof of his palace and surveyed the beauty of great Babylon. He was filled with pride by his accomplishments and declared it was for “the glory of my majesty”.

The king immediately heard a voice from heaven pronouncing the sentence on him. Nebuchadnezzar was stricken with insanity and was driven away from the palace, away from people until he lived in the field eating grass with the animals.

The physical changes described here (body was wet, long hair, long nails) are consistent with prolonged exposure with no personal care.

Psychologists classify the rare condition of lycanthropy, where a human thinks that they are animal. This was likely the case with Nebuchadnezzar, but its sudden onset and sudden disappearance can only be attributed to God.

“When men and women refuse to submit themselves to God as creatures made in His image, they are in grave danger of descending to the level of animals.” – Warren Wiersbe5

 

Daniel 4:34-35
At the end of the days I, Nebuchadnezzar, lifted my eyes to heaven, and my reason returned to me, and I blessed the Most High, and praised and honored him who lives forever,

for his dominion is an everlasting dominion,
and his kingdom endures from generation to generation;
all the inhabitants of the earth are accounted as nothing,
and he does according to his will among the host of heaven
and among the inhabitants of the earth;
and none can stay his hand
or say to him, “What have you done?”

Nebuchadnezzar’s sanity returned to him after seven years. He lifted his eyes to God which indicated both faith and submission5. He lifted his eyes and praised the Most High God.

He lives forever! He is not bound by weakness or death.

His kingdom will never end! His dominion will endure through all the kingdoms of mankind.

Man is nothing before God! All the greatness of man does not compare to God.

God is not accountable to any of his creatures! He owes man no explanation.

“[Israel failed to be the light to the Gentiles] so God used a pagan king to give glory to His name!” – Warren Wiersbe5

 

Daniel 4:36-37
At the same time my reason returned to me, and for the glory of my kingdom, my majesty and splendor returned to me. My counselors and my lords sought me, and I was established in my kingdom, and still more greatness was added to me. Now I, Nebuchadnezzar, praise and extol and honor the King of heaven, for all his works are right and his ways are just; and those who walk in pride he is able to humble.

Both Nebuchadnezzar’s sanity and his kingdom was restored. His counselors and nobles found him and reestablished him on the throne. Nebuchadnezzar increased in greatness but his praise is no longer on himself.

Nebuchadnezzar concluded his message with praise for the King of heaven. God is able to humble the proud and all His ways are right and just!

God protected Nebuchadnezzar during his seven years of insanity. Not only was he physically safe but there were no attempts to usurp the throne. Most Bible scholars credit this to Daniel’s ability to manage the kingdom, even when the king was unable to rule.

 


 

[1] It was common for the ancient kings to send formal edicts across their entire kingdoms. The king’s messengers would copy the message and send it out to be read in every part of the empire. All of the king’s subjects were required to hear this announcement. This was the same action that was done for the king’s edict about the God of the Hebrews in Daniel 3 (see here).

[2] Frank E. Gaebelein, Editor, The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Volume 7 (Zondervan, 1985), Daniel 4, pages 58-68

[3] The Hebrew Scriptures included Daniel 4:1-3 as the end of Daniel 3. However, it is almost universally agreed that Nebuchadnezzar’s praise to the Most High God is better suited to his personal encounter in chapter 4 than as a conclusion to his observations in chapter 3. Therefore, this passage serves as an introduction to Nebuchadnezzar’s account of his own humiliation2.

[4] Stephen Davey, Heaven Rules, Daniel 4, 12/02/2012

[5] Warren W. Wiersbe, The Wiersbe Bible Commentary, Daniel 4, pages 1356-1360

[6] The words which are translated “at ease” are literally, “was growing green like a tree”. This illustrated the king’s success and contentment in his palace4 5.

[7] Most credible commentators agree that the “seven periods of time” must refer to seven years2. See also Daniel 7:25, where “times” clearly indicates years. There is another possibility that the “seven times” was not an exact number but a large amount of time (e.g. Daniel 3:19).

[8] H.C. Leupold, Exposition of Daniel (Baker Book House, 1969), Daniel 5, pages 166-206

 

3 Comments »

  1. […] great party. It has been over 30 years since Nebuchadnezzar’s dream in the previous chapter (see here). Nebuchadnezzar has died and there is a new king in Babylon. Daniel is now an old man and has […]

    Pingback by The Final Party | Sapphire Sky — October 7, 2016 @ 6:32 pm

  2. […] (see here). Daniel had the kindness as an older man to counsel the king to turn from his pride (see here). Daniel had the boldness as an old man to rebuke a wicked king, telling him that his destruction […]

    Pingback by Politics and Bad Coworkers | Sapphire Sky — October 28, 2016 @ 10:06 pm

  3. […] Most Bible scholars believe that the actions to the lion (wings plucked off, stand like a man, given the mind of a man) represent Nebuchadnezzar’s humiliation and restoration (Daniel 4). […]

    Pingback by The History of the World | Sapphire Sky — November 6, 2016 @ 8:30 pm


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