Sapphire Sky

January 28, 2017

The Coming King

Filed under: encouragement, theology, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — Steve Knaus @ 9:48 pm

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“And now I have told you before it takes place, so that when it does take place you may believe.”

Jesus spoke these words to his closest friends shortly before leaving earth (John 14:29).

Within hours, Jesus Christ would be arrested by the Jewish authorities, tried by an illegal court, and crucified like a lowly criminal.

He was the one sent by God to save His people. He was the chosen one, the “anointed one”, or as is said in Hebrew, he was the Messiah.

To the religious Jews of Jesus’ day, this was preposterous. This man could not be their Messiah. They were looking for a commanding king who would validate the true children of Abraham and lead them in victory over their Roman oppressors.

Instead, they found a country preacher. He didn’t revere their nationality. He didn’t obey their Sabbath traditions. He didn’t respect their temple hierarchy. He told them that they were wrong!

So they killed Him.

But these men knew their scriptures. They studied the law and the prophets as they looked for their Messiah king. How could they know that it was Jesus?

Almost 600 years earlier, one of their greatest prophets wrote about the Messiah. Daniel was one of the wisest men of his day. He was revered by counselors, wise men, kings, and emperors.

But Daniel was also a man of prayer. He prayed every day, even if it was against the law (see here). He prayed earnestly for his people, taking responsibility for their failures, and imploring God for forgiveness (see here).

God answered Daniel’s prayer in ways that no one else had ever seen. His answer was immediate and very specific. Daniel asked God about the seventy years when his people had been captive in Babylon. God’s answer was that there was yet another seventy times seven years for His people. God had reserved this time for the Jews to end their wickedness, pay for their sins, commission the perfect sanctuary, and to bring in the perfect kingdom.

During this seventy times seven years:

  • His people, the Jews, would return back to their native land. They would rebuild their city and the temple.

    There were (at least) four edicts by the Persian emperors, allowing the Jews to return to their homeland. The first edict would have happened shortly after Daniel’s prayer in 536 B.C., and the final culmination would have been the command to restore both the city and the temple in 444 B.C.

  • They would live in their city for 69 weeks (483 years), through times of trouble.

    The Jews returned to their homeland, but they were persecuted under both the Greek and the Roman rulers during the final four centuries B.C.

  • The Messiah, the anointed one, would come to his people at the end of the 483 years.

    Jesus came into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday in 33 A.D., exactly 483 years after the edict of 444 B.C. (see below).

  • After the 483 years, the Messiah would be executed like a criminal (see here and here).

    Jesus Christ was crucified by the Romans within a week after His entry into Jerusalem, in 33 A.D.

  • Also after the 483 years, people would destroy the city and the temple.

    The Romans destroyed Jerusalem and the temple in 70 A.D.

  • A future prince will make a treaty with the Jews for seven years, and then break his promises after three and a half years. This is still in the future.

Daniel was shown 70 “weeks” (groups of seven years). 69 of these weeks have already passed, and the 70th week is still to come.

We can fall in the same trap as the religious Jews of Jesus’ day. They knew their Bible, but they only looked for what they wanted to see. God came to earth, as He promised, and they completely missed Him!

John 5:39-40
You search the Scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is they that bear witness about me, yet you refuse to come to me that you may have life.

The prophecy of the “seventy weeks” in Daniel 9 is very popular among theologians and religious speculators. There are countless predictions, interpretations, and speculations about what everything can possibly mean. False teachers have used Daniel 9 as a means to authenticate their own beliefs, leading to such sects and cults as the Seventh Day Adventist Church, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and Branch Davidian.

So how are we supposed to read this prophecy and not be caught up in some twisted teaching? Can we really understand it?

The answer is actually very simple. Like all of God’s word (scripture), we need to simply read it. Set aside our own preconceptions on how a prophecy should all fit together, and trust that the words mean what they say.

Above all, have the humility to admit that you won’t have it all figured out. Even the prophets themselves did not fully understand what they were writing:

1 Peter 1:10-11
Concerning this salvation, the prophets who prophesied about the grace that was to be yours searched and inquired carefully, inquiring what person or time the Spirit of Christ in them was indicating when he predicted the sufferings of Christ and the subsequent glories.

See the section below for more detail about basic rules for understanding Scripture.

What is the main point of prophecy? Going back to Jesus’ words to His disciples, one of the most important points about future prophecy is to remind us that God is in control. He shows us what is happening before it takes place so that we can know that He is not surprised by these events.

 

Previous post: Do We Pray?


Basic rules for understanding Scripture

 

Look for the simplest understanding of the words

Don’t look for a complicated explanation when a simple answer is already available.

In the words of David Cooper,
When the plain sense of Scripture makes common sense, seek no other sense”.

For example, the Persian emperors proclaimed edicts for the Jews to return to their native country and rebuild Jerusalem.  Therefore, we should not look further for an obscure event when we interpret the “word to restore and build Jerusalem”.

 

Read the text in its context

Make sure you understand what the entire passage is about, rather than trying to extract a single verse or statement.

For example, most of Daniel 9 is Daniel’s prayer on behalf of the city and the Jewish people (see here). Therefore, we can better understand that God’s answer of “Seventy weeks are decreed about your people and your holy city”, was directly related to Daniel’s prayer for mercy and forgiveness for the Jews and Jerusalem. We would be misguided to try and apply this specific prophecy to the U.S. or to an American city.

 

Know the historical setting

It is important to know the historical setting from when the words of scripture were written.

For example, Daniel wrote as a Jewish exile in Babylon in the 6th century B.C. Therefore, his prayer is for a city which has been destroyed for almost 70 years.

 

Be consistent with the rest of scripture

Make sure that your understanding of this scripture is consistent with other scripture.

For example, Daniel uses the term, “abomination of desolation” several times in his prophecies (Daniel 8:13, 9:27, 11:31, 12:11). We know that some of these events have been fulfilled by Antiochus Epiphanes in the 2nd century B.C. (see here).  However, Jesus also uses the “abomination of desolation” as a future event in Matthew 24:15. Therefore, some of these prophecies must be fulfilled after the time of Christ.

 

Look for the most literal understanding

Look for the most literal understanding that is consistent with both the context and other scripture.

Scripture contains figurative language, especially in prophecy, but look for the most literal interpretation that fits the text.

For example, Daniel’s vision of the beasts in Daniel 7 represented kingdoms of the world. Daniel’s description of each beast was figurative (“was like a lion”, “like a bear”, “like a leopard”, etc.), however, they also represented real, literal, physical kingdoms (Babylon, Persia, Greece).

In Daniel 9, Daniel is contemplating the literal 70 years of captivity when God answers his prayer with a very specific timeline. Therefore, the most consistent understanding of the timeline is that the 70 weeks are also literal periods of time.

Likewise, it is clear that the “weeks” of Daniel 9 are periods of seven years (see below). However, it makes no sense to try and use the same logic (as some do) to interpret other days as years. Therefore, we are not free to interpret the 2,300 days in Daniel 8:14 as 2,300 years.

“Perhaps the primary consideration in relation to the interpretation of prophecy is that, like all other areas of Biblical interpretation, it must be interpreted literally.” – J. Dwight Pentecost9

 

For more information, I recommend the following two articles:

 


Daniel 9:20-27 

While I was speaking and praying, confessing my sin and the sin of my people Israel, and presenting my plea before the Lord my God for the holy hill of my God, while I was speaking in prayer, the man Gabriel, whom I had seen in the vision at the first, came to me in swift flight at the time of the evening sacrifice. He made me understand, speaking with me and saying, “O Daniel, I have now come out to give you insight and understanding. At the beginning of your pleas for mercy a word went out, and I have come to tell it to you, for you are greatly loved. Therefore consider the word and understand the vision.

“Seventy weeks are decreed about your people and your holy city, to finish the transgression, to put an end to sin, and to atone for iniquity, to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal both vision and prophet, and to anoint a most holy place. Know therefore and understand that from the going out of the word to restore and build Jerusalem to the coming of an anointed one, a prince, there shall be seven weeks. Then for sixty-two weeks it shall be built again with squares and moat, but in a troubled time. And after the sixty-two weeks, an anointed one shall be cut off and shall have nothing. And the people of the prince who is to come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary. Its end shall come with a flood, and to the end there shall be war. Desolations are decreed. And he shall make a strong covenant with many for one week, and for half of the week he shall put an end to sacrifice and offering. And on the wing of abominations shall come one who makes desolate, until the decreed end is poured out on the desolator.”

 


Daniel 9:20-23
While I was speaking and praying, confessing my sin and the sin of my people Israel, and presenting my plea before the Lord my God for the holy hill of my God, while I was speaking in prayer, the man Gabriel, whom I had seen in the vision at the first, came to me in swift flight at the time of the evening sacrifice. He made me understand, speaking with me and saying, “O Daniel, I have now come out to give you insight and understanding. At the beginning of your pleas for mercy a word went out, and I have come to tell it to you, for you are greatly loved. Therefore consider the word and understand the vision.

Gabriel appeared to Daniel with the answer while he was still in prayer! The angel was sent at the very beginning of Daniel’s prayer.

The angel Gabriel is described as “the man Gabriel” here, indicating that he appeared as a man. Daniel had met Gabriel about ten years earlier, when God had given him the vision of the ram and the goat (Daniel 8:15-16).

Daniel’s prayer was at the time of the evening sacrifice (about 3:00 pm). The temple had been destroyed and the sacrifices were gone, but Daniel still kept the ritual of prayer during the traditional times of sacrifices. Daniel spent most of his life in Babylon, but this shows how much he cared for the temple and the city of Jerusalem.

 

Daniel 9:24
“Seventy weeks are decreed about your people and your holy city, to finish the transgression, to put an end to sin, and to atone for iniquity, to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal both vision and prophet, and to anoint a most holy place.

Daniel had prayed for Jerusalem, the temple, and for the Jewish people. God’s answer was that he had set aside (literally, “cut out”) 70 weeks for the Jews and Jerusalem.

Literally, the 70 weeks are “seventy sevens”. The best understanding is that the “week” is a group of seven years, and the 70 weeks are a total of 490 years. See the section below, titled “What is a week?” for more details.

The 70 weeks had these purposes:

to finish the transgression, to put an end to sin, and to atone for iniquity

The rebellion of Israel will be finished, sin will be ended, and the penalty for sin will be paid for. We know that Jesus Christ sacrificed Himself for the penalty of sin in His first coming, but He will return a second time to and sin will be finally defeated.

to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal both vision and prophet, and to anoint a most holy place

The Messiah will return and establish a righteous kingdom (Jeremiah 23:5-6). There will be no need for visions or prophets (Jeremiah 31:31-34), and the future temple will be set apart as most holy (Ezekiel 40-44).4

The prophecy that follows is one of the most specific predictions of all scripture!

 

Daniel 9:25 (NASB)
So you are to know and discern that from the issuing of a decree to restore and rebuild Jerusalem until Messiah the Prince there will be seven weeks and sixty-two weeks; it will be built again, with plaza and moat, even in times of distress.

The Messiah will come as a prince exactly 483 years (69 weeks) after the decree to restore and rebuild Jerusalem.

There were several decrees by the Persian emperors to restore the temple. But Nehemiah 2:5-8 records the specific decree of emperor Artaxerxes to rebuild both the temple and the city walls in 444 B.C.

The ancient Jewish calendar was shorter than our current calendar, and so 483 years after the decree of Artaxerxes comes to 33 A.D., when Jesus entered Jerusalem as the Messiah king.

The city of Jerusalem will be rebuilt with streets and a wall (“plaza and a moat”), but there will be times of trouble. Jerusalem was rebuilt, yet the people experienced severe persecution from both the Greek and the Roman rulers.

For more details, see the following sections below:

  • What was the ‘word to restore and rebuild Jerusalem’?
  • What kind of year is used in prophecy?
  • What are the ‘seven and sixty-two weeks’?

 

Daniel 9:26a
And after the sixty-two weeks, an anointed one shall be cut off and shall have nothing.

After the 69 weeks (483 years) have completed, the Messiah will be killed, and will have no earthly value left after his death.

Jesus was executed by the Romans in 33 A.D. All of his earthly possessions were taken from Him and he was killed as a lowly criminal (see here and here). Even His own followers left him at his death!

This is the first event which will occur between the 69th and the 70th week.

For more details, see the section entitled, “What is the killing of the anointed one?” below.

 

Daniel 9:26b
And the people of the prince who is to come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary. Its end shall come with a flood, and to the end there shall be war. Desolations are decreed.

Also before the final week, the Romans will destroy the city of Jerusalem and the temple. This happened almost 40 years after the death of the Messiah, in 70 A.D.

There will be war and desolation on the Jews until the end times. We have seen this fulfilled with the persecutions and massacres of the Jews throughout history.

For more details, see the section entitled, “What is the destruction of the city and the temple?” below.

 

Daniel 9:27
And he shall make a strong covenant with many for one week, and for half of the week he shall put an end to sacrifice and offering. And on the wing of abominations shall come one who makes desolate, until the decreed end is poured out on the desolator.”

The “prince who is to come” will make a treaty with the Jews for seven years (the 70th week), but halfway through this week, he will stop the sacrifices in the temple.

Unlike the previous 69 weeks, this final week is yet to come.

This prince is also known as “the antichrist”, and is the same leader who is predicted to rule like Antiochus Epiphanes in Daniel 8 (see here). He will desecrate the temple, much like Antiochus’ desecration before him (see Matthew 24:15; Mark 13:14).

“The event that triggers this last seven-year period is the signing of a covenant between the Antichrist and the Jewish nation.” – Wiersbe4

For more details, see the section entitled, “What is the final week?” below.

 


Interpretation of the “Seventy Weeks”

Theologians have proposed many different interpretations for the “Seventy Weeks” that were predicted in Daniel 9:

Daniel 9:24-27
“Seventy weeks are decreed about your people and your holy city, to finish the transgression, to put an end to sin, and to atone for iniquity, to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal both vision and prophet, and to anoint a most holy place. Know therefore and understand that from the going out of the word to restore and build Jerusalem to the coming of an anointed one, a prince, there shall be seven weeks. Then for sixty-two weeks it shall be built again with squares and moat, but in a troubled time. And after the sixty-two weeks, an anointed one shall be cut off and shall have nothing. And the people of the prince who is to come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary. Its end shall come with a flood, and to the end there shall be war. Desolations are decreed. And he shall make a strong covenant with many for one week, and for half of the week he shall put an end to sacrifice and offering. And on the wing of abominations shall come one who makes desolate, until the decreed end is poured out on the desolator.”

Daniel 9 says that God has decreed “seventy weeks” for the Jews and Jerusalem. This “seventy weeks” will be divided as follows:

  • The “word” to restore and rebuild Jerusalem begins the timeline.
  • Seven and 62 weeks to the coming of an anointed one.
  • The city will be built again for 62 weeks, but in a troubled time.
  • After the 62 weeks, the anointed one will be killed and will have nothing.
  • The “people of the prince who is to come” will destroy the city and the temple.
  • The “prince who is to come” will make a covenant for one week (the final 70th week).
  • The “prince who is to come” will end the temple worship for half of that final week.

Most of the interpretations of this passage are related to the answers to the following questions:

 

What is a “week”?

The word used for “week” is literally, “seven”. This word could be used for seven days, years, or another unit of time.

The best understanding here is that the “week” indicates seven years. Daniel is considering the 70 years of captivity in this context. The ancient Jewish culture ordered the years in groups of seven, hence the Sabbath years and the year of Jubilee.5

“The Jewish calendar is based on a series of sevens. The seventh day is the Sabbath day and the seventh year is a sabbatic year (Ex. 23:11–13). The fiftieth year (7 x 7 + 1) is the Year of Jubilee (Lev. 25). The Feast of Pentecost is seven weeks after Firstfruits (Lev. 23:15–22), and during the seventh month of the year, the Jews observed the Feast of Trumpets, the day of Atonement, and the Feast of Tabernacles.” – Wiersbe4

Seventy weeks of days (490 days) would be little more than a year to send the decree, rebuild the city, kill the anointed one, destroy the city, and make a covenant with the people. This would be very difficult to accomplish all of this within 490 days; furthermore, there is no record in history of this ever occurring within.

Others have proposed that the weeks are purely symbolic, and do not indicate any specific number of years.6 The problem with this view is that it is contrary to a literal understanding of scripture and ignores the fact that Daniel has very specific numbers for this timeline. This view is also inconsistent with Daniel’s interpretation of Jeremiah in the same chapter, when Daniel expected 70 literal years (Daniel 9:2).

Therefore, the “week” must refer to seven (7) years.

 

What was the “word to restore and rebuild Jerusalem”?

There were (at least) three decrees by the Persian emperors to rebuild the temple:1 2

The first and second decrees (by Cyrus and Artaxerxes) were to rebuild the temple, while the third decree (by Artaxerxes in 444 B.C.) was to rebuild both the temple and the city walls.

Some scholars have equated the “word to restore and rebuild Jerusalem” with Jeremiah’s prophecy that the city would be restored (Jeremiah 29:10). Jeremiah prophesied that Jerusalem would be restored after 70 years, but it is very difficult to assume that this prophecy (given before the city was even destroyed) must be the “word to restore and build Jerusalem”. This view also ignores the fact that Persian emperors gave literal decrees to rebuild Jerusalem.

The 69 weeks are divided into “seven” and “sixty-two” weeks, or 483 years. There are two possible interpretations which start with a decree to rebuild Jerusalem and lead to the presentation of the Messiah 483 years later:

  • The second decree in 457 B.C. 483 years later ends at 27 A.D., which could be the year of Christ’s baptism.
  • The third decree in 444 B.C. 483 (360-day) years later ends at 33 A.D., which could be the year of Christ’s entry into Jerusalem (using 360-day years).

Both of these views are endorsed by reliable Bible scholars, and both are consistent with Scripture. However, I expect that the decree referenced in Daniel 9 must be the third decree in 444 B.C. The evidence for a 360-day year is compelling (see below), and only the third edict was to build both the temple and the city.

In addition, Daniel’s prophecy predicts the coming of “Messiah the Prince”. Jesus received the approval from the Father when He was baptized, but it was not until He entered Jerusalem that he came to the people as a prince.2

Therefore, the best understanding is that the “word to restore and rebuild Jerusalem” occurred with the decree of Artaxerxes in 444 B.C., and is recorded in Nehemiah 2:5-8.

 

What kind of year is used in prophecy?

Our modern calendar uses a “solar” year, of 365.24 days.

However, different cultures have used different ways to record their calendar. Ancient Jews have likely used a 360-day calendar.3 The evidence in scripture shows that Biblical prophecy uses a 360-day calendar based on the following:

The following references all describe the same three-and-a-half-year period, showing that a month was recorded as being 30 days, and a year being 360 days:

Therefore, the best understanding is that a year in prophecy would be 360 days.5

 

What are the “seven and sixty-two weeks”?

Daniel 9:25 (NASB)
So you are to know and discern that from the issuing of a decree to restore and rebuild Jerusalem until Messiah the Prince there will be seven weeks and sixty-two weeks; it will be built again, with plaza and moat, even in times of distress.

The most commonly accepted interpretation is that Daniel records two time periods: 7 weeks (49 years) and 62 weeks (434 years). There will be 483 (49+434) years from decree to rebuild Jerusalem (see above) until the coming of the Messiah as a Prince.

Why the division between 7 weeks and 62 weeks? One likely possibility is the first 7 weeks (444-395 B.C.) complete the rebuilding of Jerusalem and the close of the Old Testament prophets. The remaining 62 weeks (395 B.C.-33 A.D.) show the city of Jerusalem having been rebuilt but in a troubled time.

Some have translated this verse that there are seven weeks (49 years) from the decree to the coming of the Messiah. This does not correlate with any 49-year period in history, so they view the time as purely symbolic. The additional 62 weeks are then seen figuratively as our current time. See the discussion above (under “What is a Week?”) for problems with this view.

Others have interpreted the 69 weeks, not as the prophecy of the Messiah, but as a prophecy of the persecutions under Antiochus Epiphanes (see here for more details about these persecutions). This interpretation views the “anointed one” as the High Priest Onias, who was murdered in 171 B.C., and extends the timeline to when Antiochus desecrated the temple in 168 B.C. One of the main problems with this view is that you cannot put the 483 years in this timeline. Therefore, they conclude that either (a) the years must be figurative or (b) Daniel made a mistake. This view cannot be accepted by any literal understanding of scripture.

Given the above conclusions that the decree to rebuild Jerusalem was in 444 B.C. and that the years of prophecy were 360 days, the “seven and sixty-two weeks” must represent the 490 years from 444 B.C. to 33 A.D.7

 

What is the killing of the anointed one?

After the 69 weeks the Messiah (literally, “the anointed one”) will be killed and will have nothing. The best understanding of this prophecy is that it points directly to the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. Jesus the Messiah was executed like a common criminal, with no political value or rank.

The figurative or symbolic interpretation of this prophecy associates this statement with an arbitrary event in history (such as the killing of High Priest Onias in 171 B.C.), or in the future. See above for problems with this view.

Note that the Messiah is killed after the 69 weeks. Therefore, the first 69 weeks have already concluded. The arguments for a break between the 69th and the 70th week point out that the Messiah is killed and the city is destroyed after the 69th week, yet the final week is not yet described.

Therefore, the “killing of the anointed one” clearly points to Jesus Christ at His crucifixion.

 

What is the destruction of the city and the temple?

The “people of the prince who is to come” will destroy the city and the temple. Daniel 7 predicted that a ruler will come out of the Roman Empire (see here). Daniel 9 predicts that his people, the Romans, will destroy the city of Jerusalem and the temple. This was fulfilled in 70 A.D. when the Roman army destroyed Jerusalem.

Others have proposed that the “prince who is to come” must refer to the Messiah, the same prince that was mentioned earlier. However, the prince in this part of the passage is distinguished with futuristic terms (“prince who is to come”). Most importantly, there is no literal understanding of scripture where the Messiah destroyed Jerusalem and the temple.

Therefore, the “destruction of the city and the sanctuary” was fulfilled with the Romans destroyed Jerusalem and the temple in 70 A.D.

 

What is the final week?

he will make a firm covenant with the many for one week, but in the middle of the week he will put a stop to sacrifice and grain offering

The logical antecedent of the he in this passage is the prince who is to come. There will be a future king who will rise out of the Roman empire, and he will establish a seven-year covenant.

Some have interpreted the he in this passage to the Messiah. But there is no literal reference elsewhere where Jesus will make a 7-year covenant with the people. Moreover, Jesus did not stop the sacrifices in the temple, as they continued for almost 40 years after His death and resurrection, until the temple was destroyed by the Romans in 70 A.D.

The most difficult problem with this passage is that there have been no events in history which correspond to the events in the 70th week as described by Daniel. Therefore, if we are to understand scripture literally, this must be a future event.

Furthermore, we know that the two events which were predicted to occur after the 69th week have already occurred in the first century: the Messiah was killed and Jerusalem was destroyed. The fact that these two events happened about 40 years apart shows that there must be time between the 69th and the 70th week.8

We know from Daniel 7 that the future king, known as the Antichrist, will rise up at the end times. Daniel 9 shows that the Antichrist will make a treaty for seven years. In the middle of the seven years he will force the sacrifices in the temple to stop.

 

For Further Reading

  • John Walvoord: The Prophecy Of The Seventy Weeks, http://walvoord.com/article/250
  • W. Hoehner, Chronological Aspects of the Life of Christ, 1975
  • Sir Robert Anderson, The Coming Prince, (also available online here)

 


[1] Frank E. Gaebelein, Editor, The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Volume 7 (Zondervan, 1985), Daniel 9, pages 106-121

[2] John MacArthur, Israel’s Future, Part 2, Daniel 9:24-25, 9/28/1980

[3] The account of the Flood shows a 360-day year:2

  • Genesis 7:11: The flood began on the 17th day of the 2nd month
  • Genesis 8:4: The flood came to an end on the 17th day of the 7th month, therefore the flood lasted for exactly 5 months.
  • Genesis 7:24 and Genesis 8:3 both say that the flood lasted for 150 days: Therefore, the five months must have been 30 days long.
  • “The earliest known months used then in the biblical text were 30‑day months giving us a 360‑day year.” – MacArthur

[4] Warren W. Wiersbe, The Wiersbe Bible Commentary: Old Testament (David C. Cook, 2007), Daniel 9, page 1380

[5] Doug Bookman: The End Time Drama
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=5113207553

[6] H.C. Leupold, Exposition of Daniel (Baker Book House, 1969), Daniel 9, pages 404-410

[7] 69 seven-year weeks of 360-day years is 173,880 days.

[8] John Walvoord: The Prophecy Of The Seventy Weeks, http://walvoord.com/article/250

[9] J. Dwight Pentecost, Things to Come, A Study in Biblical Eschatology (Dunham Publishing Company, 1958), pages 60-61

 

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