Sapphire Sky

January 26, 2020

He is Greater than Traditions

Filed under: encouragement, theology — Tags: , , — Steve Knaus @ 10:49 pm

photo of a person s hand touching wheat grass

Thoughts from Matthew 12…

 

Traditions.

We celebrated the Fourth of July recently, complete with picnicking and fireworks. Through all the excitement and the fun, this national tradition helps us to remember the price that was paid for our nation’s freedom.

We also have other traditions which help us to remember what is important. There are many traditions in the church, from major events such as Christmas or Easter, to smaller events such as Sunday worship or the Lord’s Supper.

We all also have family traditions. Our family has a favorite vacation spot to visit every year. Other families have a favorite restaurant or a special way to celebrate accomplishments. The traditions make the events special.

But sometimes, our traditions can get in the way. They are important, but some things are even more important.

Matthew 12 is a crucial turning point in the ministry of Jesus Christ. He has been traveling through Galilee with His disciples, teaching and healing, and proclaiming that the kingdom is at hand (see here). He has offered the kingdom to the Israelite people and this chapter (Mathew 12) is their response.

Starting first with the leaders, then with the people, they all reject Him! Hereafter, Jesus will change His focus from gathering the crowds to teaching His own disciples.

This first part of this chapter shows three scenes of conflict with the religious leaders. They have been following and challenging Him (see here and here), but their conflict now moves to outright hostility. And the cause of their conflict is over one of their most precious of the Ten Commandments — the Sabbath Day!

The Sabbath was one of the most most treasured days by the Jewish people. God created the world in six days and rested on the seventh day, thereby giving us the pattern to keep the seventh (“sabbath”) day holy. This was one of the Ten Commandments, to “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy” (Exodus 20:8-11).

The Jewish people showed their love for God and His law by faithfully keeping this commandment. The rabbis went further, giving specific rules for how to honor God on His Sabbath. By the first century, these traditions had grown into an elaborate system of rules and regulations governing what could and could not be done on the Sabbath.a

But Jesus was different on the Sabbath day. Because He did not follow their traditions, he must not be honoring their law and their day that they so treasured. They started out by questioning Him, then went to overtly challenging Him, and finally to conspiring to destroy Him.

Yet through all of this, Jesus answered all of their challenges. He never violated the Sabbath commandment, nor did He criticize their traditions. However, He did challenge their understanding of their own laws, their own history, and their inconsistency in trying to uphold the Sabbath. There are some things which are more important than traditions.

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January 19, 2020

Come to Jesus!

Filed under: encouragement, theology — Tags: , , — Steve Knaus @ 8:33 pm

oxen

Thoughts from Matthew 11…

 

What will keep you from Jesus?

We have our ideas of what it means to come to God, thinking that God only wants us if we are good enough. We need to live a good life. We need to help others who are in need. We must go to church and pray a lot. We need to be kind and gracious to each other.

It is as if we are saying that God will take us only if we are nice or good enough!

But in Matthew’s Gospel Account, Jesus takes time from His teaching to call out to those who need Him. The kingdom of heaven is not about who is rich, who is smart, who is powerful, nor who is well educated. It is not even for the religious, but for those who are weary and worn down. It is for those who trust in Jesus Christ.

He doesn’t call the religious and the devout — instead, He sends them a warning.

He doesn’t call the smart and clever — instead, He shows His wisdom to the simple ones.

And finally, He doesn’t call the hard workers to earn their way into His Kingdom. Instead, He calls the weary and overloaded.

Just as in His Sermon on the Mount, He didn’t come for the successful and powerful, He came for the broken and grieving. Only the needy ones can know what it really means to trust in Him!

What does it mean to come to Him?

It means that we must first repent. No matter how spiritual or religious we may act, we need to turn from our own ways and follow Him.

It also means that we need to trust Him like a child. We can only know Him as He reveals Himself to us.

And finally, it means to come to Him for rest. He will take away our overwhelming burden if we only come to Him. We still have the responsibility to obey and follow Him, but He promises that “my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.

Matthew 11:20-30
Then he began to denounce the cities where most of his mighty works had been done, because they did not repent. “Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes. But I tell you, it will be more bearable on the day of judgment for Tyre and Sidon than for you. And you, Capernaum, will you be exalted to heaven? You will be brought down to Hades. For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day. But I tell you that it will be more tolerable on the day of judgment for the land of Sodom than for you.”

At that time Jesus declared, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you have hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to little children; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will. All things have been handed over to me by my Father, and no one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him. Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”

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January 12, 2020

John’s Doubt and Tribute

Filed under: encouragement, theology — Tags: , , — Steve Knaus @ 11:30 pm
Johns-Prison

The cave entrance where John was held prisoner at Machaerus. Mukawer, Jordan

Thoughts from Matthew 11…

 

All four of the gospel accounts — Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John — start with the ministry of one man. Even before anyone knew about Jesus Christ, John the Baptist was preaching in the desert. He called himself, “The voice of one crying in the wilderness and had a single message, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand!” See here for an introduction to John the Baptist.

John was truly a great man. He did no miracles, yet he captivated the entire nation. They thought him strange, yet they came by the thousands to the wild desert to hear him preach. Even the religious leaders respected him, though they refused to believe him.

John was the greatest of men, yet even he was not immune to problems. His ministry was rapid and powerful, but it ended just as rapidly when Jesus started teaching (see here). King Herod had him thrown into prison when he publicly condemned the king’s marriage to his brother’s wife, Herodias.a

John languished in prison for over a year.b It was there, in his dark prison cell, that John’s doubts began to arise. Was Jesus really the promised one? Was He really their coming Messiah?

Everyone had their plans for the Messiah. Everyone had their expectations. The nation of Israel looked for a king to defeat their enemies. The religious leaders wanted a king to enforce their traditions. Jesus’ own disciples looked forward to when they would help Him rule (see here). And even John the Baptist looked forward to a Messiah who would punish and purify this sinful generation.

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